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  • What’s your legacy? What example would you want to set?

    19th September 2018 | Blog
  • Have you ever been faced with a situation where something you set out to do proved to be more challenging than you had expected? 

    Maybe it was always going to be a challenge, which is why you signed up for it in the first place, but  turned out to be a bigger challenge than you’d first imagined. Perhaps the overall task was more complicated than you thought or some of the variables were less than favourable e.g. the weather, other peoples’ reactions etc. What did you do? 

    Did you carry on and complete the task anyway or did you give up? Chances are your life story includes a mix of both. 

    Challenges are not only a test of our resilience but also an opportunity to strengthen it. Resilience is what gets us through the tough times. That includes something relatively unimportant or short-lived but challenging at the time, such as a train being delayed, or it could be the more life-changing challenges such as severe injury or illness. 

    Thankfully not everyone needs to face all of the more serious challenges but life is full of a range of them.  

    What helps you get through your tough times so that you don’t disappoint yourself with your choice of action? 

    One way to push yourself through a challenge is to think about what would you want to be known for? What example or legacy would you want to leave. This might be for your children, your teammates or your colleagues.  

    When you’re faced with your next challenge, ask yourself what would you be encouraging them to do in a similar situation. Also, perhaps more importantly, ask yourself whether they would thank you afterwards for that advice. 

    I’ve thought about this because of what happened to a friend recently. She posted on Facebook about how she almost gave up halfway through a triathlon she had been training for. A lot of things had gone wrong on the day. The weather was awful, the chain kept coming off her bike, she had a puncture and she was way behind the friend she had entered with.  

    She was about to abandon the whole thing when she thought about what she would be saying to any of her for three children in a similar situation. She soon realised that she would urge them to finish the race no matter what, so that’s what she did. She didn’t want to set an example where you give up when the going gets tough and it was holding that thought in her mind that drove her on. 

    Who would you think about when it comes to the example you would want to set? What would you want them to do in a similar situation? Would you want to be known for carrying on or giving up? 

    Just reflecting on those questions might help you find the extra edge to keep going and build your resilience. 

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